Just Giving Challenge: The results are in!

We’d like to thank everyone who participated in the 2010 Just Giving Challenge! It was our first experiment in using this blog to create space for giving together, in a sort of mini-online-community.   We’re grateful for the privilege of celebrating Jesus’ coming in a way that he would have wanted.

Whether you were able to participate this year or not, I think you might find the results interesting.

Impact by the numbers

Participants:  33

Matching Grant: $3300

Reported Giving: $8800

Total Impact: $12,100.00

Of the four organizations we profiled, Mennonite Central Committee was the winner!  They have received our Matching Grant of $3300.00, and we will be writing more about how those funds were used.

Impact in our hearts

Several participants wrote reflections on their experience.  Here’s a selection of their thoughts:

I was definitely more aware of what we spent this Christmas.  The following thought has mixed emotions:  If I spend more, I spend twice as much because I’m matching every dollar.  But it’s going to something I believe in, and, at the same time it is limiting my consumerism.  Since everything I spend costs twice as much, my instinct was “spend less”.  Wondering how this might lessen my consumer mindset if I did this year round – match every dollar I spent at a store (clothing, electronics, basically everything but a grocery store), at a restaurant, or on entertainment.  Also want to balance it by being a joyful giver.

Our family gave to an organization that provides clean water for villages without wells.  In front of the computer screen we placed two glasses of water: one clear and sparkling, one dirty and brown.  We watched a video on the impact of clean water and prayed for the recipients as we clicked the “Donate” button.  It was the most spiritual experience we’ve ever had involving a computer.

We were both struck by how simple it was to sit down by the computer, learn about these organizations, and donate. By contrast, this Christmas was so full of running around getting gifts for people and then returning unnecessary gifts from other people, that spending time thinking about this challenge was a welcomed respite.  Matching our Christmas giving seems like a great family tradition to have every year.

I did my usual end-of-year giving to organizations I support, but I also used the Advent season as an opportunity to reflect deliberately on how I use my material resources. I’ve been feeling distanced from my deeper beliefs about the issue, so I revisited old journal entries I wrote around ten years ago when things felt much clearer to me. On an intellectual level, I still completely agree with my younger self, and in terms of external manifestations little is different. But I have to admit that, on a gut or spiritual level, I don’t feel as convicted as I once did — the choices I make now feel more like a matter of habit than principle. Perhaps this mellowing is inevitable with time and age, but I find myself wondering if in fact I’ve sold-out or lost my way…

This Challenge allowed me to experience a deep joy in my holiday shopping and gave me a wonderful excuse to research new organizations that are doing God’s work in inaugurating His kingdom on Earth. I hope this Challenge returns for a second year!

Impact on others

We were amazed at the variety of different organizations to which people gave. People gave to 28 different NGOs, with only one being mentioned more than once.  Just a brief visit to these organizations’ websites is quite an education on the wide variety of creative work being done among the poor.  I encourage you to google just one that’s new to you!

  • ASELSI
  • Boston Project
  • Common Hope for Health
  • Compassion International
  • Edna Adan University Hospital (obstetric fistula work)
  • International Medical Corps
  • Joshua Fund
  • Kolkata City Mission
  • Lifewater International
  • Mennonite Central Committee
  • Mother’s Choice
  • My New Red Shoes
  • Project Muso Ladamunen
  • Room to Read
  • Samaritan’s Purse
  • Samasource
  • Shanghai Qing Cong Quan Autism School
  • Shepherd’s Field Children’s Village
  • Stop TB Partnership
  • Turkmenistan Youth & Civic Values Foundation
  • Umbrella Initiatives
  • Urban Promise Ministries, Camden NJ
  • Village Reach
  • Vipani
  • Voice of the Martyrs
  • World Vision

Profile: Mennonite Central Committee

This Advent, we are profiling four organizations that we think deserve serious consideration for your holiday giving.   Surprisingly, it’s not all that easy to find a worthy cause.  I think all of us who have ever made a charitable donation have wondered if our money is being used effectively.  From the dollar we give to the homeless guy to the online contributions we send to big relief organizations after disaster, how do we know if the sacrifice of our hard-earned money really helps those who need it most?

This difficulty is compounded if we want to direct resources toward the nearly half the planet who live on less than $2 a day.  Most of us live too far from this reality to really tell if the money we give to some organization is impactful.

That’s why for nearly ten years, every time I meet an economic development professional who actually works on the field, I ask them about which organizations they most recommend.  Within the realm of Christian non-profits, the name that most frequently comes up is Mennonite Central Committee.  I know that my inquiries are purely anecdotal and from a fairly small sample size, but I’ve been impressed at the level of universal admiration I’ve heard from practitioners of other organizations.

MCC works in the all the usual fields of development: education, emergency relief, AIDS, clean water, fair trade, etc.  But they are best known for their excellence in rural, agricultural development, with their workers typically living in the countryside alongside local farmers.  Personally, I like their approach to spirituality. They are a very explicitly Christian organization, and seek to share their faith through their work, but it seems to me that they emphasize more the demonstration of their faith, as opposed to the “preach and go” style of many Christian groups.  They also emphasize peacemaking—a reflection of their Mennonite pacifism.

Among the general public, MCC is less well known—but that’s partly because they spend far less money on advertising and promotion than nearly all the other big organizations.   Again, this is a reflection of their Mennonite ethos.  I’ve rarely found an organizational commitment to simple living that matches MCC’s.  I like that also because I know that more of my money is making an impact.

MCC is one of the four organizations we are considering supporting as part of our  Just Giving Challenge.  The week before Christmas, the readers of this blog will vote on which one they liked best, and our donation will go there!

If you want to know more about the MCC, check out their 2010 annual report video here.