Economic Discipleship on the radio

Today I was a guest on Martha Manikas-Foster’s excellent radio program Inside Out. You can check out a podcast of my interview with her here. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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Lent: Giving Out, not just Giving Up

Lent isn’t just for Catholics anymore. It seems like every year I hear even self-described nonreligious friends musing about what to give up for Lent. Check out the 100 top choices people made last year according to their Twitter feeds.  It’s an interesting mix, from the sarcastic (“virginity” or “Christianity”) to the sublime (“smoking” or “negativity”).

The point of today’s Ash Wednesday post is not to add yet another suggestion to this list. I figure if you’ve read this far, you’ve probably already considered what to give up this year. Instead I want to simply propose that Lent is not just about “giving up” but “giving out” too.  If you’re giving up Starbucks for Lent, why not calculate the amount you would have spent on your morning java and give that to the poor on Easter? If you’re giving up Facebook or Pinterest or ESPN.com, why not invest the time you would have spent surfing learning about poverty and injustice–and then give to the cause that most inspired you?

Best of all, why not supersize Lent by gathering a few friends together in order to “give up” and “give out” together? My favorite story of Lent-in-community remains my 8 friends  who one year “gave up” all drinks except tap water and creatively raised more than $40k to fund clean water wells in Haiti. This year they’re doing it again, except now they’re going for $100k!

My goals for Lent this year are more modest. Since we recently moved to a new city, we don’t yet have a small group of friends with whom we can grow in economic discipleship. Even though I blog and think and speak about this stuff all the time, I am not regularly gathering with anyone to support each other in living simply for the sake of giving generously. I’m in that stage of transition where I still don’t really have local friends I can go to a baseball game with, let alone talk about the challenging issues of living a just economic lifestyle. So this Lent, all I’m hoping for is to find a couple friends to form a Giving Group that meets 4 times a year.

If you’re doing any “giving out” this year, please comment! (And if you are doing a Lazarus at the Gate group, I’d especially love to hear about it.) I always find it very encouraging to hear what creative steps of faith groups of friends are taking. May you have a holy Ash Wednesday!

Effective Giving: Emmanuel Ministries Calcutta

One of the biggest obstacles to effective giving to the global poor is simply lack of data.  In traditional investing, even those of us who know nothing about finance have access to scores of mutual funds that pick the “best” stocks for us and package them in a portfolio that minimizes our risk. And of course there is always the most basic feedback loop of all: the bottom line. Your investments either go up or they go down.

But if your goal is make investments that reduce poverty for others, things are not quite so simple. In this case our data points are typically limited to what organizations tell us about themselves through their appeal letters, websites and marketing campaigns. There are few independent evaluators of organizations that tackle poverty to help us choose where to invest (givewell.org is one excellent exception—look for an upcoming blog post on them.) This lack of data is even more pronounced when it comes to social entrepreneurs who work within newer or smaller organizations—many of whom are doing exciting, effective work, as I wrote in my last post.

What we need much more of is a kind Rottentomatoes for relief and development organizations. So what follows is one Yelp-style review of an exciting organization we supported this Christmas.

I recently spent some time in Kolkata, India getting to know various organizations that work with the poorest of the poor. I was especially impressed with Emmanuel Ministries, which is right down the street from the headquarters of Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity. Founded in 1971 by social entrepreneurs Vijayan and Premila Pavamani, they work to empower street children, addicts, the unemployed, and slum dwellers, all of which you can read about on their website. Here’s why I was impressed by them:

  • As I talked to their leadership and staff, they all articulated a holistic approach to their work which integrated a deeply Christian worldview with a sophisticated grasp of recent scholarship in community organizing, vocational training, addiction recovery, etc.
  • Several acquaintances in InterVarsity and Word Made Flesh with experience in Kolkata spoke very highly of Emmanuel and their reputation in the community, as did leaders from local churches and other NGOs. They have worked successfully with organizations I respect like TEAR fund and Compassion International.
  • I was especially impressed by my visit to their Christian school, Calcutta Emmanuel School. Uniquely, its students come from among the poorest families in Kolkata, but the school has achieved India’s highest accreditation standards. The principal and other school leaders claim that nearly 100% of graduates go on to college. I talked to more than ten high school students and indeed, they all had detailed plans for their college careers.

If you have any knowledge of Emmanuel Ministries, please add your thoughts below.

Effective Giving: Social Entrepreneurs

The holidays are finally over. Yesterday Epiphany (or Three Kings’ Day) brought an end to the twelve days of Christmas. We decided to really go for it this year, giving little presents to our kids most every day of the mini-season. (Bonus: the stream of stuff really helped to alleviate school vacation boredom.)  But according to family tradition, on Christmas Day we gave not to each other but to Jesus, since it was His birthday. This year we chose to fund social entrepreneurs whose organizations serve the poorest of the poor, which we explained to the kids are just the kind of presents Jesus most wants (Matt 25:31-40).

Why social entrepreneurs? In recent years foundations and philanthropists have emphasized investing in promising local startup NGOs (nongovernmental organizations) in order to help them scale up. Just as business entrepreneurs have changed the marketplace through innovation, social entrepreneurs around the world have combined their creativity, commitment, and knowledge of local culture to more effectively impact those who experience poverty and injustice in their communities. Perhaps the best introduction to this phenomenon is David Bornstein’s How to Change the World, which tells the stories of social entrepreneurs who tackled issues like electrification in rural Brazil, home-based AIDS care in South Africa, and empowerment of street children in Indian megacities. Many economists claim that local organizations are often more effective and efficient than bureaucratic government programs or bloated international agencies with offices in Geneva.

However, as is the case in for-profit investing, the problem is figuring out who to fund. India alone as over a million locally founded NGOs.  Until relatively recently, we’ve given primarily to large, established, international organizations simply because I don’t know how to find smaller, local NGOs that I’m confident are effective. But this year we found that the three organizations we’ve been most excited about supporting are all in the social entrepreneur category.  My next couple blog posts will profile them. I hope they serve as a mini-How to Change the World, helping us give more effectively in this new year.  How about you? Do you prefer giving to the Fortune 500 of poverty relief, or smaller start-ups? Why?

What if Jesus were your financial advisor?

What if Jesus were your financial advisor?  What if the Son of God and His disciples were in charge of all your saving, spending, investing, and giving?  At first glance, the idea seems a bit silly, perhaps even disrespectful.  Jesus came to die for our sins, not dispense advice on mutual funds, right?

But actually, the New Testament turns out to contain an awful lot of financial insight.  In fact, Jesus and the apostles talked about it way more than other important ethical issues, such as sexuality.  Today I did little experiment to shed some light on what Jesus’ meta-message as our financial advisor would be.  First, building on several years of previous study, I decided to identify every passage in the New Testament that is directly relevant to the way we manage our money.  After a full morning’s work, I highlighted seventy-five passages (not including about 30 additional parallel texts).  Then I noted the basic theme of each text and put them all on an Excel spreadsheet.  Here’s a summary of the results:

As you can see, by far the most prominent theme in the New Testament is that our wealth is intended to be shared with the poor.  A close second was the idea, variously expressed, that money is somehow dangerous or at least distracting to our spiritual life.  Those themes make up more than TWO THIRDS of the New Testament’s teaching on money.  A final prominent theme is basically to not worry too much about money, because God will provide.

Surprisingly, less than eight percent of the relevant passages spoke about giving to support the pastor or the local church—which is the topic of the vast majority of “stewardship” sermons.  And there was almost nothing on budgeting, saving, or investing—topics that make up the vast majority of Christian financial stewardship books.

In summary, here’s what the two Great Commandments of Jesus’ financial advice look like to me:

  • You shall intentionally, generously, and regularly share your resources with the poor.
  • And a second is like it: you shall become free of consumerism and the need to find your identity in your possessions, instead trusting that God will provide what you actually need.

Now that is some weird financial advice.  You definitely won’t hear anything like that from Prudential or Charles Schwab.  For me, spending almost an entire day poring over these teachings really drove home just how radical and counter-cultural Jesus is, especially for those of us coming from a society that reveres material accumulation like no other in history.

But why not check out the Jesus’ advice for yourself?  I’d like to invite you to reflect personally on the wisdom in my spreadsheet.  If you just do about ten passages a day, it will only take a week.  And it just might be good news for your (financial) life.